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James P. Tarquin, P.A. Motto
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Inverness, FL Wrongful Termination Lawyers Serving Central Florida Employees

Wrongful Termination Q & A

Q: What constitutes a wrongful termination in Florida?

A: In Florida, a wrongful termination occurs when an employee is fired in violation of an employment contract, a collective bargaining agreement, or an employment law. In the vast majority of cases, a wrongful termination occurs when an employee is fired in violation of federal or Florida employment discrimination law. When an employer fires an employee in violation of federal or Florida employment discrimination law, the employee has been wrongfully terminated. For example, federal employment discrimination law prohibits employers from firing employees because of their race. When an employee is fired because of his or her race, the employee has been wrongfully terminated in violation of federal employment discrimination law.

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Q: What do employers mean when they say Florida is an at-will state?

A: In Florida, the overwhelming majority of employees are employed on an at-will basis. Subject to three major exceptions, this means that an employer can fire an employee at any time and for any reason, including a good reason, a bad reason, or for no reason at all. The power of employers to fire an employee at any time and for any reason is known as the employment at-will doctrine. Before the enactment of employment laws, the employment at-will doctrine meant that employees served at the pleasure of their employer and had no legal protection against termination. In other words, regardless of the reason for an employee’s discharge, the employee had no legal rights or remedies with respect to the termination decision. Employment laws constitute a major exception to the employment at-will doctrine because they significantly limit the power of employers to fire employees at any time and for any reason.

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Q: Why do Florida employers tell employees they are an at-will employee when firing them?

A: When notifying them of their termination, Florida employers often tell employees they are an at-will employee. When using the employment at-will doctrine as a weapon, Florida employers are trying to give employees the distinct but false impression they have no legal protection against being fired and there is nothing they can do about being fired. Florida employers are also attempting to mislead employees into believing that any reason given for their termination cannot be legally challenged in Florida. What Florida employers who use this heavy-handed, deceptive tactic never tell their employees is that although they may be an at-will employee, they still cannot be fired for an unlawful reason, such as a discriminatory or retaliatory reason.

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Q: Does a Florida employer have to give me a reason for firing me

A: No. In Florida, an employer does not have to give an employee a reason for terminating his or her employment. The power of employers not to give employees a reason for their termination is derived from the employment at-will doctrine. Under the employment at-will doctrine, at-will employees do not have a legal right to compel disclosure of the reason for their termination and employers do not have a legal duty to tell at-will employees the reason for their termination. Because of the employment at-will doctrine, many Florida employers tell employees they do not have to give them a reason for firing them and refuse to give employees a reason for firing them.

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Q: Do Florida courts continue to enforce the employment at-will doctrine?

A: Yes. Although the employment at-will doctrine was created by the judiciary in the 19th century, courts continue to aggressively embrace and promote the employment at-will doctrine. For example, the U.S. Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, which is the federal appellate court with jurisdiction over Florida, declared in Abel v. Dubberly, 210 F.3d 1334 (11th Cir. 2000) that “an employer may fire an employee for a good reason, a bad reason, a reason based on erroneous facts, or for no reason at all, as long as its action is not for a discriminatory reason.” As the sweeping draconian language of the Abel court reflects, many courts enthusiastically treat the employment at-will doctrine as a foundational, if not a defining, tenet of their jurisprudence.

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Q: Are there exceptions to the employment-at will doctrine?

A: Yes. In Florida, there are three major exceptions to the employment at-will doctrine. Employment contracts are an exception to the employment at-will doctrine. Employees with an employment contract generally can only be fired for “good cause.” Collective bargaining agreements are another exception to the employment at-will doctrine. Employees who are members of a union and are protected by a collective bargaining agreement generally can only be fired for “good cause.” Employment laws are the broadest exception to the employment at-will doctrine. Employees cannot be fired for a reason which constitutes an unlawful reason under an employment law.

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Q: What is an employment contract?

A: An employment contract is a written agreement entered into between an employee and an employer governing the compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of the employee’s employment. The terms of an employment contract are generally negotiated by the employee and the employer. An employment contract provides the employee with specific rights, such as the amount of the employee’s hourly wage or salary, the employee’s job title or position, the employee’s entitlement to paid leave, and the employee’s entitlement to fringe benefits. In most cases, an employment contract expressly provides that the employee will be employed for a specific period of time, such as for one year or three years. When an employment contract provides that the employee will be employed for a specific period of time, the employer generally cannot fire the employee before expiration of the contract term without “good cause.”

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Q: When is an employee wrongfully fired in violation of an employment contract?

A: Most employment contracts provide that the employee can only be fired for “good cause” and set forth the circumstances constituting “good cause” for termination. When the employee is fired without “good cause” as defined by the employment contact, the termination is a wrongful termination. Under such circumstances, the employee is entitled to recover damages in the form of lost wages or salary for wrongful termination. As the overwhelming majority of Florida employees do not have an employment contract, few employees in Florida are protected from termination by a “good cause” standard.

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Q: Are union members employed pursuant to an employment contract?

A: Generally, the compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment for union members are governed by a collective bargaining agreement rather than an individual employment contract. The collective bargaining agreement establishes the rights of all union members just like an individual employment contract does for a single employee. A collective bargaining agreement is negotiated by the union with the employer on behalf of all union members. Once ratified by union members, a collective bargaining agreement essentially becomes the employment contract for union members. Collective bargaining agreements customarily provide that union members can only be fired for “good cause.” When a union member is fired without “good cause,” the termination is a wrongful termination. As the overwhelming majority of Florida employees are not members of a union, few employees are protected from termination by a “good cause” standard.

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Q: Why is a termination in violation of an employment law a wrongful termination?

A: An employment law provides employees, even at-will employees, with legal rights with respect to their compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment. In providing employees with legal rights, an employment law also prohibits employers from discharging employees for a specifically identified reason. For example, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 provides that employers are forbidden from discharging workers because of their age. That reason, as specified in the employment law, constitutes an unlawful reason for an employee’s termination. When an employee is terminated for a reason prohibited by an employment law, the employee has been wrongfully terminated because the termination is for an unlawful reason.

The sweeping language of the U.S. Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Abel v. Dubberly, 210 F.3d 1334 (11th Cir. 2000) in aggressively embracing and promoting the employment at-will doctrine illustrates that when an employee is fired for a reason prohibited by an employment law, the employee has been wrongfully fired because the termination is for an unlawful reason. The Abel court declared that “an employer may fire an employee for a good reason, a bad reason, a reason based on erroneous facts, or for no reason at all, as long as its action is not for a discriminatory reason.” Firing an employee for a discriminatory reason is forbidden by federal and Florida employment discrimination law. Thus, an employee fired for a discriminatory reason has been wrongfully fired because the termination is for an unlawful reason (discrimination). Likewise, firing an employee for a retaliatory reason is prohibited by federal and Florida employment discrimination law. Thus, an employee fired for a retaliatory reason has been wrongfully fired because the termination is for an unlawful reason (retaliation).

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Q: When is an employee terminated for an unlawful reason under an employment law?

A: There is a broad array of federal and Florida employment laws that make it unlawful for employers to discriminate or retaliate against employees. Federal and Florida employment laws make it an unlawful employment practice for an employer to fire an employee for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason. When an employee is fired for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason and, thus, wrongfully terminated. For example, when an employer fires an older worker because it wants a younger person to fill the position, the employee has been terminated for a discriminatory reason and, thus, an unlawful reason. Likewise, when an employee is fired for lodging a sexual harassment complaint, the employee has been terminated for a retaliatory reason and, thus, an unlawful reason.

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Q: Does a Florida employer have to show “good cause” to fire me?

A: No. In the absence of employment contract or a collective bargaining agreement, Florida employees are at-will employees. Under the employment at-will doctrine, Florida employers can fire at-will employees at any time and for any reason, as long as the termination is not for a reason prohibited by an employment law. Because Florida at-will employees are not protected by a “good cause” standard for termination, Florida employees do not have to show “good cause” to fire at-will employees.

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Q: Is firing me without “good cause” evidence of a wrongful termination?

A: Unless an employee is protected by an employment contract or a collective bargaining agreement, Florida employers do not have to demonstrate “good cause” to fire an employee. In some cases, however, firing an employee without “good cause” can be evidence of a discriminatory or retaliatory motive. When an employer offers a shaky, hard-to-swallow reason for an employee’s discharge, the easier it will be for the employee to prove that the proffered reason was in reality a pretext for discrimination or retaliation. In other words, an employee’s termination decision may be so mistaken, absurd, trivial, or implausible as to show that it was an alibi tailored to justify discrimination or retaliation. As observed by the court in Stratton v. Dept. of the Aging, 132 F.3d 869 (2d Cir. 1997), “actions taken by an employer that disadvantage an employee for no logical reason constitute strong evidence of an intention to discrimination [or retaliate].”

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Q: Does federal law protect me from wrongful discharge on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or religion?

A: Yes. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) is a federal employment discrimination law that protects employees from discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or religion. When an employee is fired because of his or her race, color, national origin, sex, or religion, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of Title VII and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of Title VII. Title VII also contains an anti-retaliation provision. Under Title VII, employees cannot be retaliated against for complaining about perceived discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or religion in the workplace. When an employee is fired in retaliation for lodging a complaint about discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or religion, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of Title VII and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of Title VII.

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Q: Am I protected by federal law from being fired because of pregnancy?

A: Yes. The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 (PDA) is a federal employment discrimination law that protects employees from discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. When an employee is fired because of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason in violation of the PDA and, thus, wrongfully terminated in violation of the PDA. The PDA also protects employees from retaliation. The PDA makes it an unlawful employment practice for employers to retaliate against employees who complain about perceived discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. When an employee is fired in retaliation for making a complaint of discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of the PDA and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of the PDA.

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Q: What federal law protects me from wrongful termination on the basis of age?

A: The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) is a federal employment discrimination law that protects employees from discrimination on the basis of age. When an employee is fired because of age, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason in violation of the ADEA and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of the ADEA. The ADEA also protects employees from retaliation. Under the ADEA, employers are forbidden from retaliating against employees who complain about perceived age discrimination in the workplace. When an employer fires an employee for complaining about age discrimination at work, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of the ADEA and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation
of the ADEA.

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Q: What Florida law protects me from being wrongfully fired for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason?

A: The Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 (FCRA) protects employees from discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, pregnancy, religion, handicap, age, and marital status. When an employee is fired because of his or her race, color, national origin, sex, pregnancy, religion, handicap, age, or marital status, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason in violation of the FCRA and, thus, wrongfully terminated in violation of the FCRA. The FCRA also contains an anti-retaliation provision. Under the FCRA, it is unlawful for employers to retaliate against employees for complaining about perceived discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, pregnancy, religion, handicap, age, or marital status. When an employee is fired for lodging any such discrimination complaint, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of the FCRA and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of the FCRA.

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Q: Can an employer fire me for missing work due to a serious health condition or the birth of a child?

A: No, so long as you are an eligible employee who is protected by the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The FMLA is a federal employment law that entitles eligible employees up to 12 weeks of leave during any 12-month period because of the birth of a child or their own serious health condition. An employee must have been employed for at least one year with the employer to be eligible for leave under the FMLA. Under the FMLA, employers are prohibited from retaliating against eligible employees who miss work because of the birth of a child or their own serious health condition. When an employer fires an eligible employee in retaliation for missing work because of the birth of a child or a serious health condition, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of the FMLA and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of the FMLA.

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Q: Can I be fired for complaining about not being paid for all hours worked or not being paid overtime?

A: No. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), which is federal law, employers are obligated to pay employees for all hours worked and pay nonexempt employees overtime compensation for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. When an employer fires an employee in retaliation for complaining about not being paid for all hours worked or not being paid overtime compensation, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason in violation of the FLSA and, thus, wrongfully terminated in violation of the FLSA.

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Q: Does Florida law protect me from wrongful termination for being a whistleblower?

A: Yes. The Florida Whistleblower Act protects employees from retaliation when they object to or refuse to participate in an employer’s violation of the law. For example, an employee is protected from retaliation for complaining about unsafe or dangerous working conditions in violation of OSHA standards. Likewise, an employee is protected from retaliation for refusing to work in unsafe or dangerous working conditions in violation of OSHA standards. When an employer fires an employee in retaliation for objecting to or refusing to participate in the employer’s violation of the law, the employee has been fired for an unlawful reason in violation of the Florida Whistleblower Act and, thus, wrongfully fired in violation of the Florida Whistleblower Act.

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Q: Can a Florida employer lawfully fire me for making a workers’ compensation claim?

A: No. Florida has an employment law, Fla. Stat. § 440.205 (section 440.205), that prohibits employers from firing employees in retaliation for making or attempting to make a workers’ compensation claim. Section 440.205 also forbids employers from intimidating, coercing, or threatening to fire employees because they made or attempted to make a workers’ compensation claim. When an employer fires an employee because the employee made or attempted to make a workers’ compensation claim, the employee has been terminated for an unlawful reason in violation of section 440.205 and, thus, wrongfully terminated in violation of section 440.205.

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Q: Does an employer’s refusal to give me a reason for firing me show that I was wrongfully fired?

A: In Florida, employers are not required to give employees a reason for terminating their employment. However, when an employer refuses to give an employee a reason for termination, the employer’s refusal often indicates that the employer is hiding a discriminatory or retaliatory reason. In other words, the employer refuses to give the employee a reason because the employer knows that a discriminatory or retaliatory reason is the real reason for the termination. Thus, an employer refusal to give an employee a reason for termination often reflects a strategy intended to conceal a discriminatory or retaliatory reason.

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Q: Should I ask my employer the reason for my termination?

A: Yes. Although Florida employers do not have to give employees a reason for firing them, Florida employees should always ask an employer the reason for their termination. By doing so, employees lock the employer into the reason for their termination. In the litigation context, employers invariably conjure up new and different reasons for terminating an employee’s employment. In other words, employers change their story over time regarding why an employee was fired. The fact that an employer offers different reasons at different times for a termination decision can be used to show that discrimination or retaliation was the real reason for the termination. Indeed, an employer’s shifting explanations over time indicate that the employer changed its story to counter evidence reflecting discrimination or retaliation.

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Q: If I was fired for poor performance, does my good performance tend to show that I was wrongfully fired?

A: Yes. When an employer offers poor work performance as a justification for a termination decision, then evidence of good work performance tends to show that the articulated reason is unworthy of belief. A history of good work performance can be established by showing the employee received favorable work performance evaluations, had no disciplinary record, or received merit pay raises. Showing an employer’s proffered reason for the termination is unworthy of belief is a common method of proving that the reason was a mere pretext for unlawful discrimination or retaliation. In other words, by discrediting the employer’s articulated explanation for the termination, an employee proves that unlawful discrimination or retaliation was the real reason for the termination.

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Q: Must an employer place me on a performance improvement plan before firing me?

A: No. Employers are not legally required to subject employees to a performance improvement plan before terminating their employment. However, employers often use performance improvement plans as a pretextual justification for targeting employees for termination based on a discriminatory or retaliatory motive. When using performance improvement plans to camouflage a discriminatory or retaliatory motive, employers will give employees performance plans with unrealistic goals or higher expectations than placed on other employees. In such circumstances, an employee can use the performance improvement plan to show that he or she was placed on the performance improvement plan and set up to fail as a strategy used by the employer to conceal a discriminatory or retaliatory motive for the termination.

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Q: Must an employer follow its progressive discipline policy before firing me?

A: No. If an employer maintains a progressive discipline policy, the employer is not required by law to use the progressive discipline policy before terminating an employee. However, an employer’s failure to follow its progressive discipline policy before firing an employee may serve as evidence of a discriminatory or retaliatory motive. Employees often show they were fired for an unlawful discriminatory or retaliatory reason with evidence that the employer departed from its own written policies when making the termination decision. The employer’s departure from its own progressive disciplinary policy supports the conclusion that the employee was singled out for unfavorable treatment for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason. Such a conclusion is bolstered with evidence that the employer followed its progressive disciplinary policy with respect to other employees. The differences in treatment further demonstrate that the terminated employee was targeted for unfavorable treatment for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason.

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Q: What factors are relevant in evaluating whether I was wrongfully fired for a discriminatory reason?

A: It sometimes can be difficult to know whether you were wrongfully terminated for a discriminatory reason in violation of an employment discrimination law. Employers seemingly possess a limitless ability to come up with pretexual alibis, such as poor performance, an employee or customer complaint, or a bad attitude, that are used to cover up an unlawful discriminatory or retaliatory reason. In evaluating whether or not you were wrongfully terminated for an unlawful discriminatory reason, it is helpful to consider the following questions:

  • * Did any employees, including supervisors or managers, make any discriminatory remarks, whether about you, other employees, or third-persons, in the workplace? Discriminatory remarks by supervisors or managers are the most powerful evidence of an unlawful discriminatory discharge.
  • * Were you treated differently or less favorably from employees of a different race, national origin, sex, or religion? Stated another way, were employees of a different race, national origin, sex, or religion given preferential treatment? In many cases, an unlawful discriminatory termination can be proven through mere differences in treatment.
  • * Were you treated differently or less favorably from younger employees? In other words, were younger employees given preferential treatment? The most common method of proving that an employee was unlawfully fired because of age is by showing that the employer gave preferential treatment to younger employees.
  • * Were you subjected to any harassing behavior because of race, national origin, sex, pregnancy, religion, age, or disability? For example, did you experience any sexually harassing or racially harassing behavior at work? If so, did the employer take corrective measures to stop the discriminatory harassment? An employer’s failure to stop discriminatory harassment is evidence that the employer tolerates discrimination in the workplace, which is evidence that can be used to prove an unlawful discriminatory discharge.
  • * Were you replaced by an individual of a different race, national origin, sex, or religion? Or were you replaced by a younger individual?
  • * Were you pregnant when fired? Or were you fired shortly after returning from maternity leave? In many cases, suspicious timing, standing alone, can prove an employee was unlawfully fired because of pregnancy.
  • * Did you request an accommodation because of your pregnancy? If so, did the employer deny you an accommodation given to non-pregnant employees? An employer’s failure or refusal to treat a pregnant employee the same as non-pregnant employees is evidence that can be used to prove that an employee was unlawfully fired because of pregnancy.
  • * Did you request an accommodation for a disability? If so, regardless of whether the request was granted or denied, did the employer fire you shortly after the accommodation request. Showing that an employer targeted a disabled employee for termination after requesting an accommodation is evidence that the proffered reason for the termination was a pretext for disability discrimination.
  • * Were you denied an accommodation for your religious beliefs or practices. For example, did your religious beliefs or practices conflict with an employment requirement, and instead of accommodating your religious beliefs or practices, the employer terminated your employment.
  • * Did your employer discriminate against other employees?

If you answered “yes” to any question, you may have been wrongfully fired.

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Q: What factors are relevant in evaluating whether I was wrongfully fired for a retaliatory reason?

A: In some cases, it can be difficult to know whether you were wrongfully terminated for a retaliatory reason. Employers seemingly have an unlimited ability to conjure up reasons out of thin air for firing an employee; reasons which have no basis in fact and are used to mask an unlawful retaliatory reason or motive. In evaluating whether or not you were wrongfully terminated for an unlawful retaliatory reason, it is helpful to consider the following questions:

  • * Did you complain about any type of discrimination or harassment in the workplace, including harassment by co-workers, supervisors, managers, or customers?
  • * Did you object to or refuse to participate in a discriminatory employment practice?
  • * Did you request an accommodation for a disability?
  • * Did you request an accommodation for your religious beliefs or practices?
  • * Did you object to or refuse to participate in any unlawful act or violation of the law by the employer?
  • * Did you seek a leave of absence from work because of a serious health condition or for childbirth?
  • * Did you suffer an injury at work and make or attempt to make a workers’ compensation claim?
  • * Did you complain about not being paid for all time worked or not being overtime?
  • * Did any employees, including supervisors or managers, make any remarks expressing anger, displeasure, or resentment about your having exercised employee rights by complaining about discrimination or harassment, requesting an accommodation, objecting to or refusing to participate in an illegal act, seeking leave for a serious health condition or childbirth, or making or attempting to make a workers’ compensation claim?
  • * Were you subjected to any acts of retaliation, such as demotion, reduction in hours or pay, disciplinary action, or undeserved negative performance evaluation, after exercising your employee rights by complaining about discrimination or harassment, requesting an accommodation, objecting to or refusing to participate in an illegal act, seeking leave for a serious health condition or childbirth, or making or attempting to make a workers’ compensation claim?
  • * Did your employer retaliate against other employees who exercised their employee rights?

If you answered “yes” to any question, you may have been wrongfully fired.

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Q: Are there any other factors that are relevant in evaluating whether I was wrongfully fired for a discriminatory or retaliatory reason?

A: Yes. These factors are not exclusive. There are no hard and fast rules as to what evidence is needed to prove an employee was wrongfully terminated in violation of an employment law. Because unlawful discrimination or retaliation can be proven in many different ways, the evidence that employees can present in an attempt to establish a wrongful termination may take a variety of forms. In evaluating whether or not you were wrongfully terminated for an unlawful discriminatory or retaliatory reason, it is also helpful to consider the following questions:

  • * Do you believe that the reason given by the employer for firing you is a lie, a phony reason, or has no basis in fact?
  • * As a justification for firing you, did the employer rely on unjustified disciplinary actions or undeserved negative performance evaluations?
  • * When firing you, did the employer fail to follow any company policy, such as a progressive disciplinary policy?
  • * Were you fired for something that other employees have done and were not fired for?
  • * Did the employer target you for termination by papering your personnel file with disciplinary actions or negative performance evaluations in order to justify the termination?
  • * Were you fired for minor mistakes or infractions that the employer customarily does not treat as serious?
  • * Did the employer unfairly target and set you up for termination?
  • * If fired for poor performance, did the employer notify you that your work performance was an issue and give you an opportunity to improve your work performance before terminating your employment?
  • * As a justification for firing you, did the employer rely on information provided by an employee who had discriminated or retaliated against you?
  • * Did the employer conduct a good faith, reasonable investigation before firing you?
  • * Did the employer get your side of the story before terminating your employment?
  • * Did you ask the employer for a reason for the termination and the employer refused to give you one?

If you answered “yes” to any question, you may have been wrongfully fired.

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Q: What damages are available for wrongful termination victims?

A: There is a broad array of remedies available for wrongful termination victims. A fundamental purpose of employment law is to make persons whole for injuries suffered due to unlawful discrimination or retaliation. In other words, wrongful termination victims are entitled to be put in the position they would have occupied in the absence of discrimination or retaliation. Wrongful termination victims are entitled to recover back-pay. Back-pay awards generally reflect not only lost wages or salary, but also other benefits lost due to discrimination or retaliation. To compensate for future damages, courts are authorized to reinstate wrongful termination victims. In lieu of reinstatement, courts are also authorized to award wrongful termination victims front pay. Wrongful termination victims are also entitled to recover compensatory damages for emotional pain, suffering, inconvenience, mental anguish, and loss of enjoyment of life. Under most employment discrimination laws, punitive damages are also available for wrongful termination victims.

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Do You Have More Questions Or Believe You Have A Case?

Contact Our Inverness, FL Wrongful Termination Lawyers

If you have more questions or believe that you have a wrongful termination case, please contact our office to speak with our Citrus County, Florida wrongful termination lawyers. You will never have to pay to speak with an employment law attorney here. Our Inverness, Florida wrongful termination attorneys can help you take action to protect and vindicate your employee rights. Our Citrus County, Florida wrongful termination lawyers take wrongful termination cases on a contingency fee basis. This means that there are no attorney’s fees incurred unless there is a recovery and our attorney’s fees come solely from the monetary award you recover.

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